Monday, October 20, 2014

The Beginner's Mind Applied to Software Testing

Something has been bothering me for some time now as I conduct software testing training classes on a wide variety of topics - ISTQB certification, test management, test automation, and many others.

But it's not only in that venue I see the issue. I also see it in conferences where people attend, sit through presentations - some good and some not so good - and leave with comments like "I didn't learn anything new." Really?

I remember way back in the day when I chaired QAI's International Testing Conference (1995 - 2000) reading comments like those and asking "How could this be?" I knew we had people presenting techniques that were innovations at the time. One specific example was how to create test cases from use cases. At the time, it was a new and hot idea.

So this nagging feeling has been rolling around in my mind for weeks now. Then, this past week I had the need to learn more about something not related to testing at all. One article I found told of the author's similar quest. All of his previous attempts to solve the problem ended up looking similar, so he started over - again - except this time with a mindset in which he knew nothing about the subject. Then, he went on to describe the idea of the "Beginner's Mind." Then, it all clicked for me.

When I studied and practiced martial arts for about ten years, my fellow students and I learned that if we trusted in our belt color, or how many years we had been learning, we would get our butts kicked. In the martial arts, beginners and experts train in the same class and nobody complains. The experts mentor the beginners and they also perfect the minor flaws in their techniques. The real danger was when we thought we already knew what the teacher was teaching.

Now...back to testing training...

I respect that someone may have 30 years experience in software testing. However, those 30 years may be limited by working for one company or a few companies. Also, the person may only have worked in a single industry. Even if the experience is as wide as possible, you still don't have 100% knowledge of anything.

The best innovators I know in software testing are those that can take very basic ideas and combine them, or find a new twist on them and innovate a new (and better) way of doing something. But you can't do that if you think you already know it all.

In the ISTQB courses, I always tell my students, "You are going to need to 'un-learn' some things and not rely solely on your experience, as great as that might be." That's because the ISTQB has some specific ways it defines things. If you miss those nuances because you are thinking "Been there, done that," you may very well miss questions on the exam. I've seen it happen too many times. I've seen people with 30+ years of experience fail the exam even after taking a class!

So the next time you are at a conference, reading a book, attending a class, etc. and you start to get bored, adopt the beginner's mind. Look at the material, listen to the speaker and ask beginner questions, like "Why is this technique better that another one?", "Why can't you do ..... instead?", or "What would happen if I combined technique X with technique Y."

Adopt the beginner's mind and you might just find a whole new world of innovation and improvement waiting for you!


Monday, October 06, 2014

Dallas Ebola Patient Sent Home Because of Defect in Software Used by Many Hospitals

Here at Rice Consulting, we have been making the message to heathcare providers for over two years now, that the greatest risk they face is in the integration and testing of workflows to make sure electronic health records are correctly made available to everyone involved in the healthcare delivery process - all the way from patients to nurses, doctors and insurance companies. It is a complex domain and too many heathcare organizations see EHR as just a technical issue that the software vendor will address and test. However, that is not the case as demonstrated by this story.

From the Homeland Security News Wire today, October 6:

"Before Thomas Eric Duncan was placed in isolation for Ebola at Dallas’ Texas Health Presbyterian Hospitalon 28 September, he sought care for fever and abdominal pain three days earlier, but was sent home. During his initial visit to the hospital, Duncan told a nurse that he had recently traveled to West Africa — a sign that should have led hospital staff to test Duncan for Ebola. Instead, Duncan’s travel record was not shared with doctors who examined him later that day. This was the result of a flaw in the way the physician and nursing portions of our electronic health records (EHR). EHR software, used by many hospitals, contains separate workflows for doctors and nurses."

"Before Thomas Eric Duncan was placed in isolation for Ebola at Dallas’ Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital on 28 September, he sought care for fever and abdominal pain three days earlier, but was sent home. During his initial visit to the hospital, Duncan told a nurse that he had recently traveled to West Africa — a sign that should have led hospital staff to test Duncan for Ebola. Instead, Duncan’s travel record was not shared with doctors who examined him later that day.

'Protocols were followed by both the physician and the nurses. However, we have identified a flaw in the way the physician and nursing portions of our electronic health records (EHR) interacted in this specific case,” the hospital wrote in a statement explaining how it managed to release Duncan following his initial visit.

According to NextGov, EHR software used by many hospitals contains separate workflows for doctors and nurses. Patients’ travel history is visible to nurses, but such information 'would not automatically appear in the physician’s standard workflow.' As a result, a doctor treating Duncan would have no reason to suspect Duncan’s illness was related to Ebola.

Roughly 50 percent of U.S. physicians now use EHRs since the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) began offering incentives for the adoption of digital records. In 2012, former HHS chief Kathleen Sebelius said EHRs 'will lead to more coordination of patient care, reduced medical errors, elimination of duplicate screenings and tests and greater patient engagement in their own care.' Many healthcare security professionals, however, have pointed out that some EHR systems contain loopholes and security gaps that prevent data sharing among healthcare workers.

The New York Times recently reported that several major EHR systems are built to make data sharing between competing EHR systems difficult. Additionally, a 2013 RAND Corporationstudy for the American Medical Association found that doctors felt 'current EHR technology interferes with face-to-face discussions with patients; requires physicians to spend too much time performing clerical work; and degrades the accuracy of medical records by encouraging template-generated doctors’ notes.'

Today, Dallas’s Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital has made patients’ travel history available to both doctors and nurses. It has also modified its EHR system to highlight Ebola-endemic regions in Africa. 'We have made this change to increase the visibility and documentation of the travel question in order to alert all providers. We feel that this change will improve the early identification of patients who may be at risk for communicable diseases, including Ebola,' the hospital noted."

Monday, September 22, 2014

Special on ISTQB Foundation Level e-Learning - This Week Only!

I just wanted to let you know about a special offer that is for this week only.

Before I go into that, I want you to know why I'm making this offer.

First, I know that many people have stretched training budgets and have to make every dollar count.
Second, I have over 15 e-learning courses in software testing, but the one that I thinks covers the
most information in software testing is the ISTQB Foundation Level course.

The reason I conduct and promote the ISTQB program is because it gives a well-rounded framework for building knowledge in software testing. It's great to get your team on the same page in terms
of testing terminology. It also builds credibility for testers in an organization.

ISTQB is the International Software Test Qualifications Board, a not-for-profit organization that has defined the "ISTQB® Certified Tester" program that has become the world-wide leader in the certification of competences in software testing. Over 336,000 people worldwide have been certified in this program. The ISTQB® is an organization based on volunteer work by hundreds of international testing experts, including myself.

You can learn more at www.istqb.org and about the ASTQB (American Software Testing Qualifications Board) at www.astqb.org.



I think e-Learning has the best results in preparing people to take the ISTQB Foundation Level exam because you have time to really absorb the concepts, as opposed to trying to learn everything in 3
or 4 days. Plus, you can review the material at any time. That's hard to do in a live class. I have seen people score very high on the exam after taking this course and it gets great reviews.

OK.... now for the details....

For this week only, Monday, Sept 22 through Midnight (CDT) Friday, Sept 26th I am running a special offer on ISTQB Foundation Level certification e-learning training. If you purchase the 5-team
license, you get an extra person at no extra cost - exams included!

So, if you have been thinking about getting your team certified in software testing, this is a great opportunity - an $899 value.

In addition, if you order a 5-team license or higher, I will conduct a private one-hour web meeting Q&A session with me in advance of taking the exam. Your team also gets access to the course as
long as they need it - no time limits!

All you have to do is use the code "ISTQB9922" at checkout time. You will be contacted for the names of the participants.

Payment must be by credit card or PayPal.

To see the details of the course, go to
http://riceconsulting.com/home/index.php/ISTQB-Training-for-Software-Tester-Certification/istqb-foundation-level-course-in-software-testing.html

To learn more about the e-learning program, go to
http://riceconsulting.com/home/index.php/Table/e-Learning-in-Software-Testing/.

To register, go to https://www.mysoftwaretesting.com/ISTQB_Foundation_Level_Course_in_Software_Testing_p/istqb5.htm

Any questions? Just respond to this e-mail.

Act fast, because this deal goes away at Midnight (CDT) Friday,
Sept 26th!

Thanks!

Friday, September 12, 2014

The Software Tester's Greatest Asset

I interact with thousands of testers each year. In some cases, it's in a classroom setting, in others, it may be over a cup of coffee. Sometimes, people dialog with me through this blog, my website or my Facebook page.

The thing I sense most from testers that are "stuck" in their career or just in their ability to solve problems is that they have closed minds to other ways of doing things. Perhaps they have bought into a certain philosophy of testing, or learned testing from someone who really wasn't that good at testing.

In my observation, the current testing field is fragmented into a variety of camps, such as those that like structure, or those that reject any form of structure. There are those that insist their way is the only way to perform testing. That's unfortunate - not the debate, but the ideology.

The reality is there are many ways to perform testing. It's also easy to use the wrong approach on a particular project or task. It's the old Maslow "law of the instrument" that says, "I suppose it is tempting, if the only tool you have is a hammer, to treat everything as if it were a nail."

Let me digress for a moment...

I enjoy working on cars, even though it can be a very time-consuming, dirty and frustrating experience. I've been working on my own cars for over 40 years now. I've learned little tricks along the way to remove rusted and frozen bolts. I have a lot of tools - wrenches, sockets, hammers...you name it. The most helpful tool I own is a 2-foot piece of pipe. No, I don't hit the car with it! I use it for leverage. (I can also use it for self defense, but that's another story.) It cost me five dollars, but has saved me many hours of time. Yeah, a lowly piece of pipe slipped over the end of a wrench can do wonders.

The funny thing is that I worked on cars for many years without knowing that old mechanic's trick. It makes me wonder how many other things I don't know.

Here's the challenge...

Are you open to other ways of doing things, even if you personally don't like it?

For example, if you needed to follow a testing standard, would that make you storm out of the room in a huff?

Or, if you had to do exploratory testing, would that cause you to break out in hives?

Or, if your employer mandated that the entire test team (including you) get a certification, would you quit?

I'm not suggesting you abandon your principles or beliefs about testing. I am suggesting that in the things we reject out of hand, there could be just the solution you are looking for.

The best thing a tester does is to look at things objectively, with an open mind. When we jump to conclusions too soon, we may very well find ourselves in a position where we have lost our objectivity.

As a tester, your greatest asset is an open mind. Look at the problem from various angles. Consider the pros and cons of things, realizing that even your list of pros and cons can be skewed. Then, you can work in many contexts and also enjoy the journey.


Thursday, August 28, 2014

The Value of Checklists

For many years, I have included checklists on my Top 10 list of test tools (I also include "your brain"). Some people think this is ridiculous and inappropriate, but I have my reasons. I'm also not the only one who values checklists.

Atul Gawande makes a compelling case for checklists, especially in critical life-or-death situations in his book "The Checklist Manifesto." In reviewing the book on Amazon.com, Malcom Gladwell writes, "Gawande begins by making a distinction between errors of ignorance (mistakes we make because we don't know enough), and errors of ineptitude (mistakes we made because we don’t make proper use of what we know). Failure in the modern world, he writes, is really about the second of these errors, and he walks us through a series of examples from medicine showing how the routine tasks of surgeons have now become so incredibly complicated that mistakes of one kind or another are virtually inevitable: it's just too easy for an otherwise competent doctor to miss a step, or forget to ask a key question or, in the stress and pressure of the moment, to fail to plan properly for every eventuality."

Gladwell also makes another good point, "Experts need checklists--literally--written guides that walk them through the key steps in any complex procedure. In the last section of the book, Gawande shows how his research team has taken this idea, developed a safe surgery checklist, and applied it around the world, with staggering success."

In testing, we face similar challenges in testing all types of applications - from basic web sites to safety-critical systems. It is very easy to miss a critical detail in many of the things we do - from setting up a test environment to performing and evaluating a test.

I have a tried and true set of checklists that also help me to think of good tests to document and perform. It is important to note that a checklist leads to tests, but are not the same as test cases or the tests they represent.

I have been in some organizations where just a simple set of checklists would transform their test effectiveness from zero to over 80%! I even offer them my checklists, but there has to be the motivation (and humility) to use them correctly.

Humility? Yes, that's right. We miss things because we get too sure of ourselves and think we don't need something as lowly, simple and repetitive as a checklist.

Checklists cost little to produce, but have high-yield in value. By preventing just one production software defect, you save thousands of dollars in rework.

And...your checklists can grow as you learn new things to include. (This is especially true for my travel checklist!) So they are a great vehicle for process improvement.

Checklists can be great drivers for reviews as well. However, many people also skip the reviews. This is also unfortunate because reviews have been proven to be more effective than dynamic testing. Even lightweight peer reviews are very effective as pointed out in the e-book from Smartbear, Best Kept Secrets of Peer Code Reviews.

Now, there is a downside to checklists. That is, the tendency just to "check the box" without actually performing the action. So, from the QA perspective, I always spot check to get some sense of whether or not this is happening.

Just as my way of saying "thanks" for reading this, here is a link to one of my most popular checklists for common error conditions in software.

I would love to hear your comments about your experiences with checklists.

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

ISTQB Foundation Level Training in Software Testing (CTFL) - Chicago - Sept 16 - 18, 2014

If you are looking for ISTQB Foundation Level Software Testing Training at a reasonable price, in the Chicago area, this is your opportunity!

The class is Sept. 16 - 18, 2014, held in The Regus Offices at One Dearborn St. in downtown Chicago.

The instructor is Thomas Staab, CTFL.

We are only going to hold registrations open for one more week! We will close registrations at 5 p.m. CDT on Wed, Aug 27th.

The class is limited to 10 people. So if you want to get in on this unique opportunity - act fast!

The cost for the class is $2,000 per person, with the exam ($250 value) included in that price. The exam will be given on the final afternoon of the class.

If you bring two people, you can get $500 off your registrations. Just use code "ISTQB916" at check-out
time.

You can register here: https://www.mysoftwaretesting.com/ISTQB_Foundation_Level_Course_in_Software_Testing_p/ctflpub.htm
 
To see the outline: http://riceconsulting.com/home/index.php/ISTQB-Training-for-Software-Tester-Certification/istqb-foundation-level-course-in-software-testing.html 

I hope you can make it!

Randy

Sunday, August 17, 2014

ISTQB Advanced Test Manager Training - Live Online Sept. 15 - 19

I am offering a special live, online version of the ISTQB Advanced Test Manager Training the week of September 15 - 19, 2014. I'm also offering a special "buy 2 get 1 free" offer. Just use coupon code "ISTQB915" at https://www.mysoftwaretesting.com/ISTQB_Advanced_Test_Manager_Course_Public_Course_p/ctaltmpub.htm

Be sure to register as a remote attendee.

I will be the instructor and the class schedule will be from 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. CDT each day. You will get a complete set of printed course notes if you register at least one week in advance of the class. The sessions will be recorded and posted daily, so if you have miss a portion you can catch up.

I hope to see you there!